Monthly Archives: June 2017

UFC

It could be a mismatch. It could be a circus. It might never happen. But a lot of people seem to want to see Conor McGregor fight Floyd Mayweather Jr.And the bout inched closer to reality after McGregor and the Ultimate Fighting Championship announced that they had reached an agreement on their end.

“The McGregor side is done; I’m starting to work on the Mayweather side now,” the U.F.C. president, Dana White, said in an appearance on TNT’s postgame N.B.A. coverage Wednesday night that demonstrated again how the prospective bout has crossed over into conversation even among fans with little interest in combat sports.

“I’m not saying the fight will happen,” White cautioned.

Because McGregor, 28, is under contract to the U.F.C., he cannot just cut a deal with Mayweather on his own.

“It is an honor to sign this record-breaking deal,” McGregor said in a statement to the mixed martial arts site The Mac Life. “The first and most important part of this historic contract has now officially been signed off on. Congratulations to all parties involved. We now await Al Haymon and his boxer’s signature in the coming days.” Haymon is a promoter who works with Mayweather.

McGregor had a son on May 6 and posted a photograph on Thursday of the baby, Conor Jr., with some of his mixed martial arts belts. He added the message, “Let’s go get some boxing ones now son.”

“As soon as their side communicates with our side, then the fight will happen,” Mayweather told ESPN earlier on Wednesday.

White does not seem worried that the hype over the fight will overshadow the actual mixed martial arts events his promotion hosts. “Every once in a while, there’s this kind of fight that everyone wants to see,” he said. “I embrace it.”

Olympic 100-meter swim

Rio Olympics 100-meter freestyle gold medalist Kyle Chalmers has withdrawn from July’s world swimming championships to undergo surgery for a worsening heart condition.

Chalmers has supraventricular tachycardia, or recurrent rapid heartbeat, that is normally not life-threatening but can impact on his quality of life.

“I have increasingly begun to suffer from an abnormally fast heart rhythm during training and competitions, which now requires surgery,” he said in a statement Wednesday. “I have had surgery in the past and, unfortunately, it did not work.”

The 18-year-old Chalmers said it was a difficult decision to miss the world championships in Budapest, but he did so with a longer-term view, setting his sights on the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games in 2018.

In April, he finished second to Cameron McEvoy at the Australian championships.

Swimming Australia head coach Jacco Verhaeren said athletes’ health and well-being were the priority.

“We are at the beginning of a new Olympic cycle and, for some of our athletes, we need to look at longevity to allow them to stay at the highest level for longer,” he said. “Kyle has our full support and we know he will use this time away from competition positively and to his advantage to return for a home Commonwealth Games in 2018 and beyond.”

Chalmers will have the heart operation within several weeks.

“There is never a good time for this type of procedure, but given I’ve suffered from these symptoms during two of the past three major meets and, following my doctor’s advice, I have made the tough decision to withdraw,” he said.

Mayweather Fighters Hundreds of Millions of Dollars

We know the date: Aug. 26. We know the location: Las Vegas. We know the broadcaster: Showtime. That’s the extent of the details that have been made public about this summer’s blockbuster fight between the boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. and the mixed martial arts fighter Conor McGregor.

“The deal is done, and now all the business will be handled,” Dana ms and the vanity terms,” Hershman said.

“I don’t use vanity in any sort of pejorative way,” he added, but rather to describe negotiations over issues like who will enter the arena first, how big the entourages will be and who will appear on the left and right sides of promotional posters. “There are conventional norms to that if titles are at stake. But if there are not, or it is a unique event, you have to negotiate all of that.”

But for a fight of this magnitude, which will generate a huge amount of money, the commercial and financial terms are what matter. So how much money are we talking about here?

“If I had to guess, I think this fight could generate somewhere in the neighborhood of $400 million,” Kery Davis, a former senior vice president at HBO Sports, said. “I do believe there is a huge segment of the populace who are combat fans or who are just sports fans, who are going to be interested in seeing this spectacle.”

Olympic swimming medalists

Lilly King set an American record in the women’s 50-meter breaststroke, three other swimmers had the fastest times in the world this season and two more broke national championship records at the U.S. titles on Thursday.

Each has even bigger plans for next month’s world championships in Hungary.

“I’m always happy to get an American record, but I was hoping to go a little faster,” King said after posting a time of 29.66 seconds. “I’ve think I’ve still got a little left in the tank for Budapest.”

She’ll have almost three weeks to prepare after breaking the record Jessica Hardy held for nearly eight years by 0.14. King also could be heading to Hungary with the No. 1 time in the event this year after passing her Russian rival Yulia Efimova, who started the day in the No. 1 spot with a time of 29.88.

Katie Meili, an Olympic gold medalist like King, finished in 30.11

King has qualified in two individual events and the Indiana University star will chase her third win in three nights when she competes in her specialty, the 100 back Friday.

She was only part of the speedy equation in Indianapolis, though.

The U.S. men produced world-best times in three of the night’s four events and set a championship record in the other one.

Chase Kalisz started the impressive run in the men’s 400 individual medley, finishing in 4:06.99 — the first sub 4:07 in the world in 2017. Second-place finisher Jay Litherland, Kalisz’s teammate at Georgia, wound up second in 4:09.31, No. 4 in the world.

Event winners automatically qualify for the U.S. team. The runner-ups must wait for the selection process to end before finding out if they make the team.

Caeleb Dressel took the men’s 100 butterfly, winning in 50.87 to become the first swimmer to crack the 51-second mark this year. Twenty-six-year old Tim Phillips was second in 51.30, the third-fastest time in the world.

Dressel has qualified in three individual events for the worlds — the 100 free and the 50 and 100 fly, where he’s like to square off with rival Joseph Schooling of Singapore.

Kevin Cordes set a championship record by beating Andrew Wilson with a time of 26.88 in the men’s 50 breast, No. 3 in the world, and 19-year-old Justin Ress closed it out with another world-best performance in the 50 backstroke. He beat two Olympic gold medalists, Ryan Murphy and Matt Grevers, with a time of 24.41 — and surpassed China’s Xu Jiayu for the No. 1 spot.

Leah Smith, who finished second to Katie Ledecky in races each of the first two nights, finally won the women’s 400 IM in 4:33.86. It was third on the international list. Elizabeth Beisel wound up taking second in 4:38.55 after Ella Eastin was disqualified for a bad turn coming out of the backstroke.

Pacquiao: There will be a rematch

Rematch over retirement.

Manny Pacquiao guaranteed a return bout with Jeff Horn Monday night, shelving calls to end a sterling ring career outright.

“There’s a rematch,” Pacquiao said after having late dinner at his mansion h

Beaten by Horn in their showdown for the World Boxing Organization welterweight crown Sunday in Brisbane,
Pacquiao wants to exact revenge on the Australian, who roughed him up to earn a disputable unanimous
decision.

On Monday, however, when Horn was being feted in his hometown, he announced that if ever there will be a rematch, it should be held again n Brisbane.

Owing to the tremendous success of “Battle in Brisbane,” which reportedly enriched the city coffers by $25 million aside from gaining worldwide attention, Brisbane officials have endorsed Pacquiao-Horn II.

Informed of the development, Pacquiao said he won’t mind returning to Suncorp Stadium to seek revenge on Horn.

“Even in Brisbane, no problem,” said Pacquiao, who’s out for revenge. “There will be talks.”

One of the chief concerns is when will the bout be staged.

The original timetable is for Pacquiao to fight in November, but it still hinges on Pacquiao’s work as a senator and how swift negotiations between the Pacquiao camp and Horn’s handlers will be done.

Side issues include the fighters’ purses and the event’s coverage.

In the first fight, Pacquiao reportedly got $10 M and Horn $500,000. ESPN aired “Battle of Brisbane” on free television and posted viewership record.

Back at home with his children, Pacquiao said he would rest for a while the Senate is on break. “I’ll relax first.”

But once the rematch deal is signed, Pacquiao will get to work and put his aging body in the best shape possible.

With his legacy secured, 11-time world champion in an unprecedented eight divisions, Pacquiao said it would be easy for him to walk away.

Closing his career, with a loss however, is unacceptable for Pacquiao. If he retires, it should be on a winning note.

Horn said during the post-fight conference Sunday that he is willing to give Pacquiao a chance to regain the 147-pound crown anywhere, including the Philippines.