Support for Murray That’s Loud

Wimbledon has always been a haven for fanatical supporters, from the hordes of young women who chased Bjorn Borg around the grounds in the 1970s to the Australians who dress in yellow every year to support their countrymen and women.

Faces will be painted with the Scottish and British flags for Andy Murray over the next two weeks. But fandom can take many forms. Take a look on Twitter during a big Murray match at Wimbledon, and the chances are you will come across the commentary of Irvine Welsh, the Scottish author most famous for writing “Trainspotting,” the anarchic tale of a group of heroin addicts in Edinburgh.

The text of his tweets is often provocative, and the language usually vulgar, but his admiration for the top-ranked Murray comes across loud and clear.

Welsh, who lives in Miami, first tweeted during a Murray match when Murray beat Novak Djokovic in the 2012 United States Open final for his first Grand Slam title.

“It was something my friend and fellow Scottish writer John Niven got into doing between us for laughs,” Welsh said in an email. “Tennis commentary is generally pretty dull. Ours is grounded in the compelling perversity that the cuisine, climate and class structure of Scotland can produce a tennis champion like Murray.”

Welsh’s fandom is not just about Murray also coming from Scotland.

“I admire his incredible skills, control and pace around the court,” Welsh said. “I love how he wears the game on his face. So many players are dull and deadpan; they never change expressions whether they hit a winner or miss an easy shot.”

Many of Welsh’s tweets are unprintable, but the vast majority feature the acerbic humor that would be familiar to his readers.

“Good hold Andy son,” Welsh wrote during the 2012 U.S. Open final. “I’m going to eat a packet of McCain’s oven chips for every point you win the day pal.”